Fukushima

Restaurant Guide in Fukushima

Fukushima prefecture is located in the farthest south area of the Tohoku region. The prefecture is divided into three regions by the Abukuma Highlands and Ou mountains that run through it from the north to the south, and the coastal, central, and the inland areas are called Hama-dori, Naka-dori, and Aizu respectively. Iwaki city is located in the Hama-dori a

rea while the capital city of Fukushima as well as Koriyama city, the largest city in the prefecture, is in the Naka-dori area. While Aizu is a heavy snow-fall area, Hama-dori is a place with little snow and strong wind. These differences of weather and climate within the same prefecture contributed each area to develop its own unique culture. The Hama-dori area suffered from catastrophic damage after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Hama-dori area is over 200 kilometers away from Hinoemata-mura village on the prefectural border in the Aizu area. At the center of the prefecture, there is Lake Inawashiro, the fourth largest lake in Japan and Mount Bandai that is commonly known as “Aizu Fuji.” These places have become popular tourist spots with many hot springs. Also, Oze that stretches over the four prefectures of Gunma, Fukushima, Niigata, and Tochigi, is the 29th National Park in Japan and is also designated as a special natural monument. Aizu is the closest area to access Oze from the Fukushima prefecture side. Famous local products of Fukushima are fruits such as peaches, cherries, apples and strawberries. Koshihikari brand rice of Aizu is highly regarded along with Koshihikari produced in Unonuma in Niigata. The prefecture is also known for the culturing of carp, bonito, and Sakhalin surf clam. Since the winter is extremely cold in Aizu, different types of preserved food are made including freeze dried tofu, dried persimmons, and fermented rice with herring. In addition, under the influence of the feudalism by the Matsudaira clan of Aizu during the Edo period, a unique local food culture developed. Since sericulture was thriving in the Naka-dori area, many of the traditional customs of celebrating the seasonal events with ohagi (pounded rice balls coated with sweet red beans, etc.), mochi, and dango (mochi balls) according to the sericulture calendar still remain.

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Nigiri sushi

うまい鮨勘 安積支店

Umai Sushikan

Grilled chicken skewer

Grilled chicken skewer

個室居酒屋 庵ぐら 福島駅前店

Angura

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Types of Sushi: A Complete List From Nigiri to Narezushi

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Guide to Umeshu (Japanese Plum Wine): A Sweet & Sour Tipple

Guide to Umeshu (Japanese Plum Wine): A Sweet & Sour Tipple

Guide to Umeshu (Japanese Plum Wine): A Sweet & Sour Tipple

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