Kagawa

Restaurant Guide in Kagawa

Kagawa prefecture is located in the northeastern part of Shikoku and faces the Seto Inland Sea. It is the smallest of all 47 prefectures in Japan. The capital is the city of Takamatsu. Half of the prefecture is occupied by flat land, and since there are not many rivers that run through the prefecture with little precipitation, there are over 14,000 reservoir

s in the prefecture. Over 110 islands including the Shodo Island, the Shiwaku Islands, and the Naoshima Islands exist in Seto Inland Sea. Yashima to the east of the city of Takamatsu is a scenic area designated as the Setonaikai National Park with beautiful views of the islands in the ocean. Of the islands in Kagawa prefecture, the Shodoshima Island is becoming increasingly more well-known in recent years as the production site of olives. There are some small scale agricultural productions with rice as a primary product while lettuce, onions, and tangerines are also grown. As for wheat, a breed called “sanuki no yume” (dream of Sanuki) developed to make sanuki udon noodles is primarily grown here. Sanuki udon is a soul food of the Kagawa people. It has a strong texture but goes down smoothly. Consumption of udon noodles by Takamatsu people both at home and outside is by far the highest in Japan. In 2011, the prefecture attracted public attention by rolling out a campaign calling itself the “udon prefecture” to promote sightseeing. One of the most famous tourist spots in Kagawa prefecture is the Kotohira-gu shrine that has been familiar among people as “Konpira-san” since long ago. The shrine is also known for the number of stone steps leading to the shrine. There are 785 steps to the main sanctuary, and the total number of steps including those to the inner sanctuary amount to 1,368. The shrine shares its popularity with Konpira hot springs that flourished as the home territory of the shrine. Anmochi zoni is a local specialty dish that is very characteristic of Kagawa. To make this dish, mochi filled with sweet bean paste is cooked in white miso soup. It is said that during the Edo period, commoners who wished to enjoy a little luxury for the New Year’s celebration, added sugar to bean paste and made this dish. It has since become an authentic New Year’s dish.

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