Kumamoto

Restaurant Guide in Kumamoto

Kumamoto prefecture is located at the center of the Kyushu region. It is the former feudal domain of Higo. Although the city of Kumamoto has a population of over 700,000, the city is capable of providing sufficient tap water using only underground water, which is a rarity throughout the world. Although the climate is mild, the temperature difference between

summer and winter is extreme. The prefecture is roughly divided into three areas: the northern area with Arao and Aso cities, the central area with Kumamoto city, and the southern area with Yatsushiro and Amakusa cities. The Aso area has mountains including Mt. Aso that is known for “Aso caldera,” which is the second largest caldera in Japan. As for agricultural products, Kumamoto has the highest production volume of tomatoes, soft rush, leaf tabaco, watermelon, and baby’s breath (gypsophila) in Japan. In particular, soft rush used to make tatami mats are almost exclusively produced in Kumamoto prefecture. Cattle breeding is thriving in Kikuchi city and the Aso region. In the Ariake Sea and along the coast of Amakusa, Japanese tiger prawns, seaweed, and pearls are being cultured. As for sightseeing spots, there is the famous 400-year-old Kumamoto castle in Kumamoto city. Also, Yamaga in the middle basin of the Kikuchi River is known as the town of hot springs and ancient tombs as well as the Lantern Festival. Yachiyo-za theater in Yachiyo city is a replication of a common playhouse in the Edo period and is also known as an important cultural property. In Yachiyo, there is a unique waterfall called “Nabegataki.” Here, visitors can actually climb behind the waterfalls. Amakusa area has many places that are associated with Amakusa Shiro and the history of Japanese Christians during the feudal period. Karashi renkon is a traditional food representative of Kumamoto. It is made by filling sliced lotus roots with mustard. It was a secret recipe kept within the household of the feudal lord, Hosokawa clan, but after the Meiji Restoration, the recipe spread to the general public. Horse meat sashimi is also famous, and it is said that the custom of eating horse meat sashimi began during the era of samurai warriors, when warriors were forced to eat battle horse meat when they ran out of their provisions.

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Edible horse meat

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和風個室居酒屋 ほむら ‐焔‐ 熊本西銀座通り店

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