Saga

Restaurant Guide in Saga

Saga prefecture is located in the northwestern part of the Kyushu region. The capital is Saga city. Both its population and gross area are the smallest of all the seven prefectures in Kyushu. Since the prefecture was divided into the feudal domains of Saga and Karatsu in the old days, the area centering around Karatsu city is called the northern part while t

he area centering around Saga city is called the southern part. The prefecture is known for its primary industries, especially for agriculture, and boasts the highest production volume of glutinous rice in Japan. As a secondary crop to rice, wheat and soy beans are also grown. As for vegetable farming, production of onions that are mostly grown in the reclaimed land is the second highest in the nation. The prefecture is also known for its specific varieties of strawberries such as Sagahonoka and Toyonoka. Tea growing is flourishing in Ureshino city, the birthplace of Japanese tea. A rare fish, mutsugoro (bluespotted mud hopper) can be caught at Nanaura beach in Kashima city along the Ariake Sea. It can be enjoyed as sashimi or candied, but broiled mutsugoro is most popular among tourists. In the Bay of Karatsu, the squid of Yobuko city is famous. Both ikizukuri sashimi (freshly sliced fish presented in a lifelike shape on a plate) and cooked squid such as squid shaomai are popular. Originally, Yobuko city began to gain fame for its squid around 1969. When a newly opened fish cuisine restaurant in Yobuko city served ikizukuri, which was a very rare way of serving sashimi, other restaurants all emulated it and attracted attention. In the western part of Saga, the porcelain industry is flourishing, and many famous styles of porcelain such as aritayaki (imariyaki) and karatsuyaki are created here. It is said that porcelain artisans who came from Korea in the 17th century began making aritayaki using high quality pottery stone at Izumiyama quarry. In Karatsu city of Saga prefecture, there is a famous scenic area, “Niji no Matsubara.” It is one of the three most famous pine groves in Japan and is part of the Genkai Quasi-National Park that faces the Bay of Karatsu. An arc of Japanese black pines stretches for approximately 5 kilometers. This grove is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty.

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